{1 - 24} GreyGrey
{25 - 49} GreenGreen
{50 - 499} BlueBlue
{500 - 4999} OrangeOrange
{5000 - 24999} RedRed
{25000+} BlackBlack

Please confirm that you would like to report this for an admin to review.


Double-booked schedule

Who else works 30 min child prophys and 40-60 min adult prophys on a double-booked type schedule? How do you manage your time without compromising care? How do you handle being double-booked?

What does this type of schedule reveal about the office you’re working at? This is the first office I’ve worked at that has this type of schedule. I’m having serious doubts about staying bc I’m always behind and frustrated with what I don’t have time to do. Also lots of little frustrations with room setup, instrument quality, etc. Any insight would be great. Thank you!



Confirm that you would like to Remove Email Alerts for your question. You cant undo this and you will not be able to re-subscribe.


4 Answers

If you have a dedicated and extremely focused hygiene assistant that you work well with, who turns over rooms (you need two operatories), helps with the doctor exam, takes radiographs, etc. then it can be done. However, keep in mind that its harder to build patient rapport due to less time with the patient, patients may feel like they are just being passed around, and doubling the amount of patients you see per day can take a toll physically and mentally on you.
 
From my personal experience, the office I worked at that did this cared more about production than actual patient care. Now, this is only my experience. I’m sure there are offices out there that do assisted hygiene and give excellent patient care. I just didn’t find that to be the case in my situation. I vowed I would never work at an office that didn’t give 60 minutes for recare appointments. I physically couldn’t handle seeing up to 18 patients per day nor could I live morally with the fact that the patients were just seen as money for the doctor instead of unique and important individuals.
 
If there are multiple red flags to you, this may not be the office for you. Even with seeing 8 patients per day, you need quality equipment/instruments to lessen your risk of musculoskeletal injury and be efficient with your time. When adding more patients to your schedule, quality instruments are especially important. You risk injury to yourself and shortening of your career without them. You need to do what you feel is right for you and the patients you treat. Best of luck in whatever you decide!

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


They don’t provide assistants for hygiene. I also don’t choose to double-book myself; the office staff does that wherever there’s an empty slot in the schedule. There are no-shows, but oftentimes both pts show. I work in a place where not all pts get a “check” every 6 months. It’s impossible to get the doc for each pt and stay on schedule. Oftentimes my timing has been good but wait 10-20 minutes for the doc to come to check. Then turn over the room after. I’m usually anywhere from 10-45 minutes behind. The OM says don’t worry about being behind, just focus on excellent care, but I know I slow the office down. A front desk staff person stays late til I’m done.
And yes, the physical toll of that many pts is undeniable. I have a hard time seeing the longevity of this kind of work pace. I love my pts but I hate that this is what dentistry has come to.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


Oh, I gotcha!
 
If both patients show and you have only 40-60 minutes to see both, you simply aren’t able to “focus on excellent care” in my opinion! I certainly wouldn’t want to go to an office, dental or otherwise, where I have the same appointment time as someone else, just in case one person didn’t show up. That’s being production-focused, not patient-focused. I mean, heaven forbid you have a gap in your schedule and you have time to help with sterile, restock your operatory, sharpen your instruments, and help other co-workers. If there’s a cancellation and its filled through a quick-fill list (people that want their appointment sooner and are able to come in short notice) that’s one thing, but double scheduling “just in case” is poor form. Poor scheduling and always running late is not only hard on you because you are always playing catch up, but horrible for the patients who did show up on time. Patients notice when you are rushed. Both your time and the patient’s time needs to be respected. The patient’s scheduled time should be their’s alone. Sounds like a quick way to lose patients if you ask me. What an ordeal!
 
I must say that not all offices are like this. You may need to continue your search to find your forever dental home. Working like that isn’t fair to you or to the patients in the slightest.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


This sounds like one of my offices in a nut shell. By the end of the day I am so frazzled & rushed that I end up inhaling my dinner & running around my home like I do at work all day, it’s hard coming down when you’ve had a day like that. Best of luck to you!

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


You must be Logged In to Answer this Question

Already a Member, Log In
Not a member yet? Sign Up

Search

Categories

Like Kara RDH on Facebook!