{1 - 24} GreyGrey
{25 - 49} GreenGreen
{50 - 499} BlueBlue
{500 - 4999} OrangeOrange
{5000 - 24999} RedRed
{25000+} BlackBlack

Please confirm that you would like to report this for an admin to review.


IA injection and electric shock

It seems with almost every patient I give the IA to, they feel an electric shock. Clearly I am hitting the IA nerve on a regular basis. Is this normal?



Confirm that you would like to Remove Email Alerts for your question. You cant undo this and you will not be able to re-subscribe.


3 Answers

You are either a little too low on your landmark or you just need to pull back a little once you hit bone.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


If a patient feels an electric shock sensation during an injection, the needle should be moved slightly (pull out a few millimeters) before continuing the deposition of anesthetic. Between 3% and 8% of our patients will feel an unpleasant electric shock on insertion of the needle for an inferior alveolar nerve block because the needle has come into contact with the nerve sheath. Studies and experience have shown that the vast majority of these contacts do not result in nerve damage as the tendency is for the needle to pass between the individual nerve fascicles. It can be difficult to avoid because every patient’s anatomical landmarks are different and reference points for an injection vary from patient to patient. If your patients are experiencing an electric shock more than 8% of the time, you may want to move your insertion point a few millimeters. While the injection needs to go close to the nerve, and you can’t see where the nerve is, it’s hard to give an exact answer to this question! For your piece of mind, numerous studies have demonstrated that an electrical shock sensation is not indicative of permanent nerve injury, even though damage to the nerve may occur because of needle contact. This form of direct trauma heals within 2 weeks in 81% of patients, with no residual damage to the nerve.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


I should have asked if the electric shock was on the tongue. If it is then you are likely a little low on the landmark.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


You must be Logged In to Answer this Question

Already a Member, Log In
Not a member yet? Sign Up

Search

Categories

Like Kara RDH on Facebook!