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Office Atmosphere

I work in an office where the DDS and her lead assistant are best friends, outside of work as well. Occasionally there may be some favoritism shown, but that is not the problem. They bicker in front of other employees, argue about all sorts of things (sometimes work related, sometimes not) and it can make a very hostile work environment. It’s a small office and everyone can feel the tension in the air when this occurs, which happens all too frequently. Employee retention has been a problem as well due to the attitudes, as the same DDS tends to take her frustrations out on other employees. How can this be handled? Can anything be done?
P.S. The DDS is not approachable about the subject!



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5 Answers

Unfortunately in such small work environments if the “boss” isnt much of a professional you are not going to change it…you have to adapt and find your own way to deal with it or move on to an environment that fits you…in such small businesses getting involved wont change your boss it only adds to your own drama…I would put up with more of this in my younger years…now…I just dont do drama…plenty of jobs out there… 🙂 good luck

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I agree 100% with DebbieG. You are not gonna change the boss only stir up drama and no matter what your boss says she WILL tell her friend “the dental assistant” about it when they are hanging out. Guess what then you will be even MORE uncomfortable at work and there will be more tension. Trust me some situations are best left alone. Your best bet is to take your time and look for another job:( Hope this helps

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I might write down some specific instances where you feel uncomfortable. Then, whether or not the DDS is approachable, you may need to speak with her about this. As the boss, she is not allowed to have a difficult or uncomfortable work environment for her employees.
She needs to know she is doing this, especially if it is affecting how patients are treated.
I say bite the bullet and go for it. It may seem daunting, but maybe she will respond more favorably than you anticipate and if she doesn’t, you may want to consider finding a new position. Handling a practice in the manner she is, will eventually lead to a failing/failed practice.
Good luck! Keep us posted.

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Thanks ladies. I have a feeling you’re right. Things said in confidence to either of them often get shared between each other, so why would this be any different? The sad part is, when the DDS takes her frustrations out on the employees, it is often in front of patients, making for an even more uncomfortable situation!

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I’m surprised there are still patients coming to office. I would move on. Usually if an office has a high turnover there is a reason. You have to have a good leader. That leader needs to know how to keep friendships and work separate. I know through experience that you should be friendly at work, but not to get too close outside the office. Some friendships can’t handle some work conflicts like you let someone slide with their job because they are such a good friend and then when they aren’t stepping up to the plate when needed and you call them on it the friendship is broken. Too many fine lines in work friendships. Good luck!

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