{1 - 24} GreyGrey
{25 - 49} GreenGreen
{50 - 499} BlueBlue
{500 - 4999} OrangeOrange
{5000 - 24999} RedRed
{25000+} BlackBlack

Please confirm that you would like to report this for an admin to review.


Patients who wince during cleaning

I have been a hygienist about 5 years now and am generally confident in my skills. Once in awhile I will have patients who wince in a few areas while I’m cleaning them and I always worry it’s something I’m doing wrong with the instrumentation, rather than their own gingivitis or something. If I know their mouth is full of gingivitis is one thing but when it doesn’t seem bad, I worry it’s something I’m doing wrong, though generally I don’t have an issue when cleaning patients. Anyone else have this and how to stop worrying?



Confirm that you would like to Remove Email Alerts for your question. You cant undo this and you will not be able to re-subscribe.


2 Answers

If you generally don’t have an issue with people wincing and it only happens once in a while, I doubt its something you are doing wrong. Some people are more reactionary than others and wince even if it doesn’t “hurt” per se, but they simply “felt” something. When people wince I like to ask them what they are feeling. There’s a differentiation between feeling pressure, to tenderness from infection, to sensitivity due to recession (even the smallest amount of recession can cause sensitivity). Depending on what they feel, it may not be you at all, but infection, recession, etc. Also, don’t be afraid to grab a probe to check for infection if a patient winces when you are treating an area. You can also use an intraoral camera or have a patient use a hand mirror and you can show them recession (or whatever the reason for the discomfort) to ensure, not only yourself, but the patient why they feel what they feel. If nothing obvious is causing their discomfort, and you are using the ultrasonic, you may need to turn it down a touch or use more water. Double check yourself on your instrumentation and blade angle too. If the patient says pressure (from instrumentation) is causing discomfort, double check the pressure you are using with your working strokes. However, the biggie here is to make sure your instruments are sharp. Dull instruments make you work harder (and can cause injury to you) and the pressure you must use to remove deposits effectively (without burnishing) can be uncomfortable to a patient. However, like mentioned above, I don’t think you are necessarily doing something wrong. I think finding the cause of the discomfort will give you some answers and help with the worrying. Above all, be confident in your skills. Questioning your ability and pushing to be the best clinician you can be is awesome – but don’t let it stress you out or cause worry – look at it as challenge. Scalers up!

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


Thank you. It seems to be a combo of dull instruments and making sure to rotate the instrument from what I can tell.

Confirm that you would like to select this answer as the "Best Answer" to your question. This will bring this answer to to top and be highlighted as "Best Answer". You can always change this if a better answer is given.


You must be Logged In to Answer this Question

Already a Member, Log In
Not a member yet? Sign Up

Search

Categories

Like Kara RDH on Facebook!