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residual cement

I’m having trouble detecting any residual cement after a crown seat – ie crown margin v cement – even with careful evaluation with 11/12 explorer. I’d love any tips for both detection and/or removal. Thanks a million in advance!



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Author Note:
I should clarify: I'm a hygienist - we often see residual cement left after a crown seat. For example, on bwx at the next scheduled recall appt. Also, sometimes my co-worker hygienist will mention in her chart notes that she removed residual cement after I'd seen the pt for recall following a crown seat.....an issue I very much want to improve!

4 Answers

Radiographs work great at detecting residual cement inter-proximally. Inflamed gingiva is a good give away that there is cement present. I’ve seen very inflamed bleeding gingiva due to residual cement, especially if all other areas of the mouth are relatively healthy. I use an 11/12 or shepherds hook explorer to detect. If you don’t see it in the radiographs or the gingiva appears healthy (giving the patient has good hc) then cement should be completely or mostly removed.

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I use a light diagonal sweep across the margin of the crown where I suspect there might be residual cement. You can go over all of the surfaces and if you find something either scale from the base of what you have found and smooth or head in with an ultrasonic tip along the margin of the crown. Let that tooth rest and go back to it when you are finished with the rest of your be responding and bleeding should be done. If you aren’t having luck with an explorer or scaler, floss with a very light tough can clue you in to something. A crown margin will feel like a bump but residual calculus or cement will have a roughness that will catch the floss. Good luck, you’ll get it!!

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so helpful! thank you both!

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I try to review my pt charts daily and make myself a note if they have had a crown seated in the last 6 mo and make and effort to ck this area for residual cement.

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